Overhead Crane and Hoist Safety and Maintenance Checklist

The proper operation and safety of your overhead cranes and hoists is vitally important since they potentially carry heavy loads near workers and over critical machinery and equipment. In addition, your overhead cranes and hoists most likely are critically important parts of your manufacturing and material handling process. Unplanned downtime caused by breakdowns could bring your production process to a halt. The operational failure of an overhead crane or hoist could shut down your production, or worse, injure a worker. Therefore, proper inspections, repairs and preventive maintenance of your cranes and hoists are not only the “law” (mandated by OSHA and ANSI), but really make smart business sense! An operational overhead crane helps keep your business running, while a failed crane can shut it down.

Safety Inspection Requirements

Overhead crane and hoists inspections are mandated by both OSHA and ANSI with the various requirements outlined in Federal OSHA 1910.179 regulations as well as various ANSI B30 standards. The types of inspections required in OSHA and ANSI are fairly consistent within the regulation and standards books and include: initial inspection, periodic inspection, frequent inspection, and daily/shift.

  • “Initial” Inspections: includes a load test of up to 125% of rated capacity and thorough hands-on inspection and operational check of the crane or hoist equipment. The Initial Inspection must be performed when the equipment is installed and whenever repairs are made to critical load-bearing components. The Initial documentation must be maintained for the life of the equipment along with the repair history.
  • “Periodic” Inspections: include an operational check and thorough hands-on inspection of the crane or hoist equipment. The Periodic Inspection must be performed as frequent as monthly on equipment that has usage that would create the potential for frequent repair and safety issues to as little as annually on seldom-used equipment that has little to no potential for repair and safety issues. The majority of equipment will require quarterly to monthly periodic inspections due to manufacturer requirements and frequency of found defects. Periodic documentation must be also be maintained for the life of the equipment.
  • “Frequent” Inspections: Include an operation check as well as a visual inspection of critical items listed in the codes and standards such as limit switches, wire rope, chain, hooks, etc. Frequent inspections are required at least monthly and generally done in months when the periodic inspections will not be performed.

Typical Inspection Program for Normal Operation 1 Shift Per Day

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Periodic & Frequent Inspection

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

Frequent Inspection

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

Typical Inspection Program for Heavy Operation 1 Shift Per Day

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Periodic & Frequent Inspection

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

Frequent Inspection

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

Typical Inspection Program for Heavy Operation Multiple Shift Per Day

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Periodic & Frequent Inspection

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Frequent Inspection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correction of Safety and Repair Deficiencies

After an inspection of the overhead crane and hoist, the responsibility to ensure that any found safety and repair deficiencies are properly corrected falls back on the “designated individual”. The “designated individual” in this case is an OSHA term for the person assigned the task of reviewing the inspection program as well as the resultant reports and ordering repairs. The important part to remember here is that all repairs that constitute a safety hazard must be corrected prior to the equipment being placed back in service. So if you continue to operate cranes or hoists with known safety hazards, you are placing your workers’ safety and organization at great risk.

Qualified Inspectors

Whom you allow to inspect your cranes is as just as important as the proper frequency of inspection. The controls that operate the motors and brakes as well as the complex safety limits, specifically designed to protect life and property, are truly unique to crane and hoisting equipment. Making matters worse, mechanical and control designs can vary greatly from one brand to the next. Therefore to ensure safety, crane equipment must only be inspected and repaired by skilled and experienced professional technicians having the proper experience and training to understand specific design, function and repair requirements. CMAA specification 78 outlines the requirements for qualified inspectors. If your inspector is not properly qualified, what you don’t find out about your overhead crane equipment after the inspection could come back to harm your business.

Preventive and Predictive Maintenance

Beyond the requirement for safety inspections and repairs, OSHA 1910.179 also mandates that a maintenance program be implemented per the manufacturer’s recommendations. Not only is this a requirement, it makes economic sense as well. A properly maintained crane or hoist will last twice as long as one that is neglected. If you analyze the cost of proper maintenance and the resultant decrease in unplanned repairs with the extension of useful life, preventive maintenance is one of the best investments you can make. The great thing is that the preventive maintenance can easily be done in conjunction with the periodic inspections. So you get safety, reliability and equipment longevity with the same minor expense.

CRANE 1’s IN-SPEC Overhead Crane & Hoist Inspection Program solves your problems.

No matter what brand of crane or hoist you own, CRANE 1 has the expertise and capability to optimize your inspection program.

IN-SPEC Inspections:

  • We analyze your equipment, application, usage and repair history to determine the optimum inspection types and frequency to maximize safety and reduce downtime to acceptable minimums.
  • We utilize trained and experience Inspectors and Safety Specialists who have the skills and ability to identify safety and operational issues that will cause problems down the line.
  • We break your found inspection deficiencies into “Code and Safety” issues that must be repaired immediately, “Repair Required” issues that must be fixed to bring the crane functionally to satisfactory and reduce the risk of near-term down time; and “Moderate Wear” items that will likely last until the next scheduled periodic inspection, but should be budgeted for correction soon.
  • Our IN-SPEC inspections provide our inspectors with enough time on the crane to properly inspect all visible and accessible components and systems that could potentially fail – leading to unplanned downtime or safety issue.
  • IN-SPEC inspections are optimally scheduled with the customer with inspection frequency often enough to be able to identify safety and repair defects before they occur or shortly thereafter.

Contact CRANE1 today and find out what we can do to help with all of your overhead crane inspection and maintenance needs.