/sites/default/files/sub-blog-01.png

CRANE 1 Blog Content

Stay Up-to-Date With Industry Trends, News & Information

2018-25

Hook inspection requirements are outlined in ASME B30.10 and require that hooks be visually inspected during the normal course of use by the operator as well as periodically by a designated or qualified individual.  Non-destructive testing is required based upon the recommendation of the designated person responsible for the periodic hook inspections.  The frequency and documentation requirement of the periodic inspection shall be dependent on the type of equipment in which the hook is used, but at least annually. During the inspection, some of the conditions that should be looked for include:

Read More

2018-24

There is a fair amount of confusion regarding explosion proof and spark resistance in hoist and crane applications.   The following article explains the difference and gives some information on how to specify the classification of the application.

Read More

2018-23

Before you look at runway alignment and elevation as the cause of the tracking issues you are having with your bridge cranes, it is wise to rule out some other problems with the crane itself.  Many times there are multiple simultaneous causes of tracking problems and solving one sometimes leads to even worse performance.  In this article, we examine some of the other reasons or contributors to the tracking issues of your cranes.

Read More

2018-22

The following OSHA excerpts and clarifications outline the requirements for load testing of cranes per 1910.179.

Read More

2018-22

It’s something that a lot of crane owners overlook, but it’s much more important than you may understand. A properly aligned crane is imperative to meet the performance requirements outlined by industry standards, and poor alignment can cause a chain reaction of issues, ultimately resulting in unnecessary wear-and-tear and unplanned downtime.  It’s the end user’s responsibility to ensure that crane runway tolerances are within the requirements outlined by CMAA. There are several factors that are essential to ensure your runway’s proper alignment: elevation levels, spans, straightness, and the overall condition of the runways.

Read More

2018-21

CRANE 1 has compiled a number of crane & hoist safety and operational tips in this blog article.

Read More

2018-20

The proper use of lifting points is often overlooked in mold and die handling leading to the continued use of inappropriate lifting points—increasing the possibility of failures and/or injuries.
While not as prevalent as in the past, forged eyebolt use is still a common and potentially dangerous practice if not performed correctly. Any nonvertical torqued lift on an eyebolt seriously diminishes the working load limit.

Read More

2018-19
Die handling is rough on overhead cranes; causing shock loading, side loading, and swaying or drifting loads which all contribute to damaging wear and tear to the crane system’s wire rope, motor, gearbox, couplings, and brake components.

Read More

2018-18

No other technological development in nearly 40 years has done more to revolutionize overhead crane operation and maintenance than the AC Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). Today’s Variable Frequency Controls and Flux Vector Motor Controls have become the industry standard for crane and hoist control. VFD’s have replaced the older technologies of wound rotor motor control, static step-less and eddy- current.  

CRANE 1 features the full line of Magnetek control products and is a Magnetek Performance Partner

Read More

2018-17

CRANE 1 receives many requests for hot metal hoisting applications each year.  The proper selection of the hoist with proper hot metal features is vital to ensure the safety of the operator and the longevity of the equipment. Design and special feature requirements for overhead hoists and cranes for use in hot molten metal or material applications are specified in various standards.

Read More